Types of Dentists

Understanding the differences in dental specializations is the first way to know which dentist will meet your needs. Here's a summary of the various areas of dentistry.

 

 

General Practice

 

Private general dental offices can be owned and operated by licensed and board-certified dentists. Nevertheless, these dentists don't necessarily work alone but with other dentists or additional dental professionals, such as hygienists. Patients will frequent a general dental practice for routine cleanings and dental exams. Since your general health is directly connected to oral care, a general dentist will educate patients on proper dental hygiene practices.

 

 

Dental Public Health

 

Contrasting to general practice, Dental Public Health is a group of chosen dentists whose goal is to enhance the community's oral health, not just individuals. These dental specialists set dental guidelines and investigate situations to understand if there's a public dental health problem at large.

 

 

Dentist Anesthesiologist

 

An anesthesiologist in dentistry has advanced education in pain management throughout the body. They can dispense sedation or anesthesia to patients to ease discomfort and anxiety. Due to their vast knowledge of body pain, Dentist Anesthesiologists are available in private and public settings.

 

 

Endodontics

 

The area of dentistry that aims to preserve teeth by focusing on the surrounding roots tissues is called Endodontics. After diagnosing tooth pain due to decay or trauma, Endodontists use their additional training to complete intricate procedures such as root canals.

 

 

Periodontics

 

Gum health and attention to supporting teeth structures are the main focus of a Periodontist. To treat advanced gum disease, a patient's general dentist may refer them to a Periodontist. You will need additional education in order to become a Periodontist. This education includes learning how to treat periodontal diseases and how to maintain and repair dental implants.

 

 

Prosthodontics

 

Prosthetic Dentistry is namely Prosthodontics. This dentistry area works on restoring teeth function and well-being using synthetic substitutes such as dentures, crowns, or veneers. The specialized skills of the Prosthodontist make these complex cosmetic procedures possible.

 

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology

 

Diagnosing and treating oral and related structure diseases is the goal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Dentists, alternately named Head and Neck Pathology Dentists. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathologists will evaluate lifestyle and clinical aspects in order to determine the origin of a diseased area.

 

 

Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology

 

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology examines scans, such as CT and MRI, of the head, mouth, and face to discern if disease or facial abnormalities are present. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologists can work in the education and dental industries.

 

 

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

 

The treatment of injuries and diseases in the neck, jaw, and facial areas is handled by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Dentists. These Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons must be committed as it could take more than ten years of schooling to learn everything needed for their complex procedures.

 

 

Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics

 

The alignment of the teeth and jaws is the area of dentistry called Orthodontia. Dentofacial Orthodontics is a specialty in Orthodontia that focuses on facial growth abnormalities. Orthodontists offer standard treatment options, including wires, retainers, and braces.

 

 

Pediatric Dentistry

 

The Pediatric Dentist helps children and young adults maintain healthy oral hygiene habits. Pediatric Dentistry performs routine exams to identify irregularities and prevent them from affecting children's growth and development

 

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